Designer Spotlight

Jeanne Lanvin, 1867-1946

Jeanne Lanvin began her career as a milliner in Paris in 1890, and later started the fashion house of Lanvin, the oldest Paris fashion house still in existance today.  She became known for the dresses she made for her daughter, Marie-Blanche.  Other mothers and young women wanted her designs for their own children and themselves.

She opened her clothing store in 1909, selling mother-daughter garments, and her “robes de style” designs.  The “robes de style” dress consisted of a nipped in waist and full skirt; 18th century designs with modern embellishments.  She was influential in bringing fashion such as Eastern styles to Paris, and the Chemise dress of the 1920’s, as well as innovations like the modern department store.  Her store was the first to dress the entire family in ready-to-wear clothing when she introduced a menswear department in 1926.  She dressed many celebrity clients including Marlene Dietrich, Mary Pickford, and royalty from Italy, Romania, and England.  Her impeccable craftsmanship and design has continued throughout the house’s existence since her death in 1946 through today, under the direction of chief designer Elber Albaz.

Madame Jeanne Lanvin has always kept the symbol that inspired her and her fashions in her label logo.  As seen in the label below, the left corner has an image of a mother kneeling in front of her daughter.  This dress also has an Henri Bendel label which notes which store of fashion boutique it was sold at.

1979-022-021label

This Black Lace Evening Dress is from 1930 is a part of the Museum of Texas Tech’s permanent collections.  The overlay is completely made of lace, with ruffled layers making up the skirt for a flowing effect.  There is a black silk shift, underlayer for lining.  The straps have a cream, silk ribbon woven through the lace.  An interesting design feature, the zipper is in the front of the bodice for decoration.

1979-022-021zipper

Object of the Day

Texas Tech Saddle Tramp Uniform, 1936-1937

This Saturday the Texas Tech Red Raiders play at home against the University of New Mexico.  Let’s get ready for some college football!

The Saddle Tramps is the oldest student spirit organization at Texas Tech University, founded in 1936.  The founders of this organization brought about many of the University’s traditions, and it is involved in service to the school and Lubbock community.

Some Saddle Tramp projects include raising money to buy the first forty band uniforms, helping to obtain the fountain and TTU seal at the Broadway Street campus entrance, and helping restore the Tech Dairy Barn in the early 1990’s through monetary donations.

Game-day traditions include wrapping the Will Rogers & Soapsuds “Riding into the Sunset” statue in red crepe paper, and ringing the victory bells for thirty minutes after every home football, men’s basketball, and baseball win. The bells are also rung for every Tech Big 12 Championship win, and after every graduation.  They also make the Homecoming bonfire, and conduct a torchlight parade at the beginning of the bonfire for the Carol of Lights.

Saddle Tramp Jim Gaspard created the university’s costumed mascot Raider Red, based on a character by Dirk West.  During each mascot’s tenure, the identity of the person playing Raider Red is unknown to everyone but the Saddle Tramps.

This uniform is from 1936-1937, and consists of red flannel pants, a button-down over-shirt, and a tank under-shirt.  The back of the button-down shirt has a black, felt megaphone applique with “Tech” stitched on top.  The under-shirt displays a faded black “T” printed on the front.

Object of the Day

Ivory Brocade Dress, 1912

April 14, 2012 marks one-hundred years since the Titanic’s sinking.  The clothing and textiles collections at the Museum of TTU has this dress from the same era (1912), and of the same fashion that would have been seen on first class passengers aboard the Titanic.

This ivory brocade dress’ bodice is tucked on the left side of a pointed V-yoke, over which the right side is bound with black satin over a wide French re-embroidered lace.  The trim is repeated on the sleeves, and on the skirt front in a diagonal line from the right side to the lower left, extending around the hemline in the back.

Fashions from the 1910s started changing from the constricting and voluptuous styles of the Edwardian era, to the straight-lined, lighter silhouettes of the Art Deco era.  The flowing and soft look of this period was heavily inspired by the opulent fashion of the Orientalist aesthetic, brought by the Ballet Russes when they performed Scheherazade in Paris in 1910.  Paul Poirot was one of the first designers to make the transition from the corseted look of the Victorian age, into the more natural and draped designs of the modern era.  Many characterize this extravagant and rich fashion style with that of the tragic ocean liner, Titanic.  In more recent pop culture, the PBS mini-series Downton Abbey has popularized this era, as well as its opulent fashions, which begins with the news of the Titanic’s sinking.

1912-1914 Paul Poiret Evening Dress. Courtesy of the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Courtesy of the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

For more examples from the Museum of TTU textiles collection of this straight-lined, flowing style from the early 1910s era, go to our Current Exhibits page under the exhibit They Weren’t Always White to vote on your favorite Art Deco styled wedding dress!

Object of the Day

Texas Technological College Arena Ritas Uniform, 1929

This two-piece uniform belonged to a member of the  Arena Ritas, the first pep squad at Texas Tech.  The uniform consists of a bolero jacket and skirt made of black corduroy.  The bolero-like jacket is open down the front, and is worn with a shirt underneath.  The sleeves have red, cotton satin appliques on the shoulders and cuffs.  The flared, knee-length skirt has five inverted pleats of bright red, cotton satin.

Courtesy of The University Archives at Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library

The Arena Ritas perform at half-time at a Texas Technological College football game.  To see this and other original photographs of TTU history, please visit The University Archives at Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library campus location in Lubbock, Texas.

Object of the Day

Blue Crepe Dinner Dress, 1930s

Detail of the chevron-studded sleeve

This dress belonged to Lubbock native, Dorothy Rylander.  She attended Texas Technical College (later to become Texas Tech University).  Beginning college in 1927, she received both a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degrees in history. Her association with TTC was interrupted for several years when she worked in the office of Texas Congressman George Mahon in Washington, DC from 1946-1953.

Ms. Rylander wore this blue crepe dinner dress during her time at the college. The bias cut of the fabric along with the cowl neckline represent common design elements of the 1930s. Alternating gold and silver square studded chevrons embellish the bell-cut sleeves.

Throughout her long and fruitful career, she contributed to several entities on campus, including the College of Engineering, the West Texas Museum and the West Texas Museum Association, and the Southwest Collection. Retiring in 1971, she remained actively involved in community organizations in Lubbock receiving both the “Freda McVay Award for Community Service” in 1981 and the TTU’s “College of Arts and Science’s Distinguished Alumnus Award” in 1988.